My Favorite Breakfast

Greens,egg,bacon.jpg This is so simple. When I’m making one serving, I take my small skillet and add 2 slices of bacon, each cut in half. The pan is placed on a burner set to low. I run out and feed the sheep. The bacon is almost done upon my return. When the it is done, I remove it and add enough frozen mustard, collard, turnip or spinach greens to cover the bottom of the pan. An egg is cracked on top. The pan is covered and the heat is still at low. If I think I won’t be distracted and I can be quick like a bunny, I run out and feed the rabbits. Otherwise, I do a few kitchen tasks. Part way through the cooking I baste the egg with a little water and recover the pan. When the egg is cooked to perfection, it is all removed to a plate and the feast begins.

 

Tips & Tricks Tuesday

Do you love to find a new, easier, more productive way to accomplish a task or get more bang for your buck? I’m a fan of easy, time and money saving tips. Each Tuesday, I’ll share what works for me, for others or something I read in an old Mother Earth News. This post also a feature on the new Farming in My Fifties Facebook page. Feel free to share any tips you have either place. … Continue reading

Tips & Tricks Tuesday

Do you love to find a new, easier, more productive way to accomplish a task or get more bang for your buck? I’m a fan of easy, time and money saving tips. Each Tuesday, I’ll share what works for me, for others or something I read in an old Mother Earth News. This is also a feature on the new Farming in My Fifties Facebook page. Feel free to share any tips you have either … Continue reading

Smart Walking to Save Energy & Time

Before getting to the gist of smart walking, I want to thank the farmers at From the Country Farm for the use of the photo demonstrating Farm Family Walking. While not really Smart Walking, it certainly is a novel way to get a little exercise on a snowy winter day. Pay them a visit; they have a lot going on. Now, to the subject at hand. In my quest to save the Big Four (time, labor, money, … Continue reading

Retained Heat Cooking – So Frugal & Carefree

When I read about retained heat cooking, I knew this was a frugal solution to the dilemma of finding time to prepare healthy meals on a busy homestead. Soup or stew is boiled for about 15 minutes and then the pot is placed in an insulated container and left for the day. The food cooks slowly, much as it would in a crock pot and there is nothing scorched or stuck to the bottom of … Continue reading