How to Adjust a Spiral Tube Sock Pattern

Measure around the highest part of the leg where you want the sock to be. Subtract one half to one inch from that measurement. If the measurement is 14 inches, subtract an inch to make it 13. Test the gauge by knitting a swatch in the ribbing pattern with the yarn and needles you will be using. Measure the swatch to see how many stitches are in an inch. When you have determined the number of stitches per inch, multiply the stitches per inch by the measurement you took around the leg. For instance, if your gauge is 6 stitches/inch multiply by 13 inches to get 78 stitches. Since the pattern requires that the number of stitches be divisible by 3, check that. The example given is divisible by three and would give 26 stitches per needle. If the number isn’t divisible by 3, add or subtract a stitch or two until it works out.
Measure the bottom of the foot. Measure from the heel to the highest part of the leg you want to sock to come to. Add these together to get the length of the sock.
It isn’t a bad idea to check the fitting once the sock is about 6 inches long and make sure it slips over his foot okay.

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Titan Chains Update


It has been months since I’ve mentioned Titan Chains. This company literally saved my little homestead by providing needed income after my husband died rather suddenly. I was a happy crafter from 8/11 – 3/13 when Titan closed down due to difficulty finding wire that was consistent. During the down time they revamped the process & started over with a new team. The new website is much easier to navigate & the FAQs address the most pertinent questions that most independent contractors will have. Although the basics of the bracelet design are very similar there are enough changes to warrant formerly approved crafters to start from the beginning.
The new bracelets incorporate both single & double weave & are a wonderful improvement over the original design. The payment of $120 profit for a lot of 10 remains the same.
Once I’m caught up on fiber processing & knitting, I hope to start once again with Titan. Until then, I will use what I’ve learned to make a few bracelets to have on hand for birthday & Christmas gifts. I did this last year & the bracelets were well received. I incorporated stones that are peculiar to Michigan & are of special interest to anyone who grew up or spent much time around Lake Michigan. Titan also offers an array of supplies for sale for those who prefer to come up with their own designs.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.

Catching Up

It’s been 8 months since I’ve posted here or on The Frugal Homestead. Not only have I missed being here, I’ve also missed keeping up with many of you through your blogs. Last October a hair/mineral analysis revealed toxic levels of copper. Not long after that revelation, the associated adrenal fatigue got the best of me & I truly wondered if I would be able to manage living this lifestyle. Recovery seemed slow with frustrating setbacks, but I am making progress & feeling more energetic.
Since my two blogs have a similar focus, I’ll be merging them into one. Hence the new title Farming In My Fifties/The Frugal Homestead. BTW, the first part of the title is now a lie as I’ve turned 60. I’ll move content from TFH here when I have spare moments.
My sincere apologies to those of you who took the time to comment & received no response. Some of you requested comfrey & I didn’t know how to answer. I’m willing to share roots. Before, I didn’t have the energy to dig them. I’m feeling much more able bodied now & will contact the post office to check the regulations for mailing the roots.
I hope everyone has been enjoying the best, most productive summer ever! I look forward to catching up & reading about what everyone has been up to.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.

How to Build a Cattle/Livestock Panel Hoop

cattle panel hoop house

5 panel hoop Raising much of our food has long been the goal of our humble homestead. Unfortunately, I dislike all the work involved with canning & freezing the season’s bounty. Maybe you are like me. Then I read Four-Season Harvest by Eliot Coleman and learned of a better way. A way that we could extend the growing season & eat fresh food. A way that would cut down on the amount of food preservation … Continue reading

Tips for Growing Green Fodder

You’ve longingly viewed the pictures of lush, green fodder that you see in ads & in posts online. Others are growing this for their animals & you know you can, too. Last week I posted about how I grow fodder. It is a simple concept, but success depends on temperature & moisture. There are a few things that can go wrong & cause your fodder to flop. Improper Watering This is often the biggest problem, … Continue reading