Nifty Little Slippers

Sorry no pattern this time. I made these from patterns in my favorite felting book, Knit One, Felt Too. I used yarn from my feltiest Shetland and modified the slippers by needle felting layers of dyed locks. The needle felting made the slipper substantial, almost like a shoe. The bottom is coated with bright yellow plastic coating as explained in a previous post. It has a sort of hippie look…

Embellished with needle felting
Coated with plasti-dip

 
The plain Jane before dressing her up a little


Next I made a pair of slippers for my daughter. This is a different pattern from the same book. It is so easy and works up quickly. It is the felted version of a pattern that was popular in the ’50s. Theirs was done in a cute checkerboard fashion with little felted balls for decoration. I just knit it from natural colored Shetland wool. I then knit a big square with yarn from a dye job gone wrong, felted it & cut soles to add to the bottoms. We know how fast the bottoms wear thin. Plus the additional sole makes them cushy & warmer on our cold floors.

Side view

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.

Adding a Waterproof, Non-Slip Coating to Knit Slippers

Felted wool slippers keep my family’s feet warm during our long cold weather season. Knit or crocheted slippers are treacherous on linoleum floors. Add in the water from rain and melted snow and the danger of falling is greatly increased. Besides, who likes getting wet feet from stepping in the a puddle of melted snow? I was looking for a long-lasting, waterproof substance that would keep my loved ones from slipping on our cold ceramic tile floors. The plastic dip that is used to coat the handles of tools is made to order for this purpose. It costs $8 to $10 and one can will coat about 3 adult-size pairs of slippers.
It is important to apply it in a well-ventilated area.

Things to have on hand:
Paint brush
Naphtha, xylene or toulene to clean the brush after use
Newspapers or paper bags to protect the work surface
Masking tape to create an edge

How to Apply the Plastic Coating

  1. Put the slipper on your foot and determine how far up the sides, toe and heel you want the coating to come. Use the masking tape to outline the area.
  2. Give the product a good stir.
  3. Brush the coating on the slipper soles up to the masking tape.
  4. Find a place outside or in the garage to allow the slipper to dry. You can leave them inside, but be prepared for the fumes and leave a window open.
  5. Let dry for about 30 minutes.
  6. Touch up any missed spots and then re-coat the entire area.
  7. Wait 8 hours before wearing.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.

Fleece Tights for Cold Weather

I wear skirts and dresses a lot. As soon as fall approaches, it is time to break out the tights. I am so tired of flimsy tights that wear out and aren’t really very warm. I decided to check out Amazon.com to see what they had to offer.
I was immediately attracted to the wool tights, but they were way out of my price range. Then I noticed the Royal Cult Skinny Fit Fleece Tights and purchased two pairs. First of all, my legs aren’t all that “skinny” and they fit just fine. When I first opened them and touched them I thought, “Oh no, these look and feel like a wetsuit.” That was not the look or sensation I was after. Once they are all stretched out on your legs, they look fine. Just like tights. They are very warm, sturdy and wonderfully soft. There are no seams in weird places either. They met my next criteria and qualified for Free Super Saver Shipping.
Best of all, I used the Amazon credits I’d earned with Swagbucks so they were really free.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.
 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged