Winter Has Dealt a Few Blows

Winter has been magnificently beautiful and simultaneously cruel this year and kept me too busy to read the blogs I enjoy or to share things I find interesting. Chores take a lot longer when it is so cold that they can’t be completed at one go. The situation has been further complicated by drifting snow in my path to the sheep. So, between taking a break to warm up from the cold or rest up … Continue reading

Fodder Solutions Global Premiere Video

There is much helpful information in this video of an international Fodder Solutions conference. This is my third season sprouting grain for my sheep, rabbits, dairy goats and poultry and there is always something to learn. I’ve always sprouted livestock grain and have encountered problems with inconsistent germination, trash in the grain and mold. Through tweaking soaking and watering methods I’ve managed to overcome these obstacles yet wondered if I was getting peak production. Watching … Continue reading

The Kid’s Sled to Chore Sled- A Back Saver

I always lament that time when winter is officially here and using the hose to water the livestock is no longer possible. There are few things harder on the old back then lugging water to various groups of animals and dragging the frozen buckets back to thaw. Then there’s hay and fodder to distribute. The whole process feels like it takes eons when you’re toting buckets and armloads of hay hither and yon. Practice might make the job … Continue reading

Free Animal Bedding

We try to economize in every area, no matter how incidental. There are times when we go through a lot of bedding, especially when raising chicks. We get bags of shredded paper free from our local hospital. I’m sure there are other institutions that shred paper and would love to have someone pick it up. Those bags take up a lot of room in the dumpster. The hospital personnel would rather see the paper put … Continue reading

Hoops to House Chickens or Salad Greens

We use these arched structures for different purposes. They are relatively easy for two people to build. My husband could put them together by himself. One year we used a long one to keep salad greens and thyme alive from November until February. The leaf lettuce stopped actively growing in November and resumed growing at the end of February. The months in between the greens were still alive and able to be harvested. Kind of like extended … Continue reading