Titan Chains Update


It has been months since I’ve mentioned Titan Chains. This company literally saved my little homestead by providing needed income after my husband died rather suddenly. I was a happy crafter from 8/11 – 3/13 when Titan closed down due to difficulty finding wire that was consistent. During the down time they revamped the process & started over with a new team. The new website is much easier to navigate & the FAQs address the most pertinent questions that most independent contractors will have. Although the basics of the bracelet design are very similar there are enough changes to warrant formerly approved crafters to start from the beginning.
The new bracelets incorporate both single & double weave & are a wonderful improvement over the original design. The payment of $120 profit for a lot of 10 remains the same.
Once I’m caught up on fiber processing & knitting, I hope to start once again with Titan. Until then, I will use what I’ve learned to make a few bracelets to have on hand for birthday & Christmas gifts. I did this last year & the bracelets were well received. I incorporated stones that are peculiar to Michigan & are of special interest to anyone who grew up or spent much time around Lake Michigan. Titan also offers an array of supplies for sale for those who prefer to come up with their own designs.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.

Work at Home: Titan Chains

My Bracelets: Style 1 (R) and Style 2 (L)

For the past couple of years, I’ve worked from home at various jobs I found on the Internet. My favorite is making bracelets for Titan Chains. I ordered my kit in August of 2011, am now making a couple of lots each week and still getting things done around the homestead. There is no counting or place holding involved. My day is full of interruptions and the work can easily be set aside and resumed later.
These bracelets are made from stainless wire that is “knit” around a mandrel. The mandrel is so slender that it seems like it would be impossible to work with. Appearances are deceiving and once the technique is mastered, it is simple and relaxing work. Perseverance is key along with the old adage, “practice makes perfect”.  Even though I hadn’t worked with wire before, it wasn’t difficult to learn the process. The biggest challenge, for me was maintaining even tension and finishing the ends.

Titan Chains provides excellent visual and written instructions. There is also a help desk staffed by knowledgeable people to bail the crafter out when she gets stuck. I was surprised by the thorough review I received. Not only were my mistakes pointed out, but I was given tips on how to correct them.
There are fees involved with any craft-at-home opportunity. The fees pay for the tools and supplies that are sent to the prospective worker. The staff that gives the reviews must also be paid. The fee is returned after a specified number of lots have been submitted. Once you are approved to work for them, all supplies are provided free of charge. You are even reimbursed for the postage you pay to send the bracelets in. Payments are consistent and fall on the same day each week. 
This job is a perfect fit for my homesteading lifestyle. The consistent work and timely payments are as reliable as any off-site job I’ve ever had.
Another benefit is that I’ve gotten great deals on supplies from Titan to make & sell my own creations. Without putting forth much effort, I sold 10 bracelets around Christmas. I haven’t investigated selling on Etsy yet, but that is a future plan.
I have a few suggestions to pass along that make weaving viking knit chains a tad bit easier.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: I may receive commissions/revenue from affiliates or advertisers for endorsements, recommendations, and/or links to products or services from this blog. It doesn’t change the cost to you and helps offset expenses on this frugal homestead.